Travel for Someday

Fingal’s Cave (Cave of Melody) : Isle of Mull, Argyll, Scotland

Fingal’s Cave is a sea cave on the uninhabited island of Staffa, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, part of a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland. It is formed entirely from hexagonally jointed basalt columns, similar in structure to (and part of the same ancient lava flow as) the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland and those of nearby Ulva.  In both cases, the cooling surface of the mass of hot lava cracked in a  hexagonal pattern in a similar way to drying mud cracking as it  shrinks, and these cracks gradually extended down into the mass of lava  as it cooled and shrank to form the columns, which were subsequently  exposed by erosion.

Its size and naturally arched roof,and the eerie sounds produced by the echoes of waves, give it the atmosphere of a natural cathedral. The cave’s Gaelic name, Uamh-Binn, means “cave of melody.”

The cave was brought to the attention of the English-speaking world by 18th-century naturalist Sir Joseph Banks in 1772. It became known as Fingal’s Cave after the eponymous hero of an epic poem by 18th-century Scots poet-historian James Macpherson (…wiki)

source

official website

map

video

tripadvisor

Advertisements
This entry was published on February 3, 2012 at 11:38 pm. It’s filed under Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: